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Европейската космическа агенция

ESA Budget for 2015

     

Member state                       

ESA convention  

National programme  


Contr.   
(mill. €)

Contr.
(%)

1

Austria[note 1]

1986-12-30 

FFG


51.5

1.6%

2

Belgium[note 2]

1978-10-03

BELSPO


189.5

5.8%

3

Czech Republic[note 3]

2008-11-12

Ministry of Transport 


14.2

0.4%

4

Denmark[note 2]

1977-09-15

DTU Space


26.8

0.8%

5

Estonia[note 3]

2015-02-04

ESO


0.8

0.1%

6

Finland [note 3]

1995-01-01

TEKES


19.6

0.6%

7

France[note 2]

1980-10-30

CNES


718.2

22.2%

8

Germany[note 2]

1977-07-26

DLR


797.4

24.6%

9

Greece[note 3]

2005-03-09

ISARS


12.1

0.4%

10

Hungary[note 3]

2015-02-24

HSO




11

 Ireland[note 1]

1980-12-10

EI


18.0

0.6%

12

Italy[note 2]

1978-02-20

ASI


329.9

10.2%

13

Luxembourg[note 3] 

2005-06-30

Luxinnovation


23.0

0.7%

14

Netherlands[note 2]

1979-02-06

NSO


74.7

2.3%

15

Norway[note 1]

1986-12-30

NSC


59.8

1.8%

16

Poland[note 3]

2012-11-19

POLSA


30.0

0.9%

17

Portugal[note 3]

2000-11-14

FCT


16.7

0.5%

18

Romania[note 3]

2011-12-22

ROSA


25.4

0.8%

19

Spain[note 2]

1979-02-07

INTA


131.7

4.1%

20

Sweden[note 2]

1976-04-06

SNSB


80.3

2.5%

21

Switzerland[note 2]

1976-11-19

SSO


134.9

4.2%

22.

United Kingdom[note 2]  

1978-03-28

UKSA


322.3

9.9%


Other


149.8

4.6%


Associate members







Canada[note 4]

1979-01-01

CSA


15.5

0.5%


Total members and associates




3,241.2

100%


European Union[note 5]

2004-05-28[27]

ESP

86.5%

1,191.7

36.8%


Total ESA




4,433.0

136.8%


EUMETSAT

10.3%

122.4

3.7%


Other income

3.3%

38.8

1.2%


Total



100,0%

  4,594.2       

141.7%

Vega VV04 liftoff with IXV spaceplane

11 February 2015

An experimental vehicle to develop an autonomous European reentry capability for future reusable space transportation has completed its mission. ESA’s Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle flew a flawless reentry and splashed down in the Pacific Ocean just west of the Galapagos islands.

The IXV(Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle) spaceplane lifted off at 13:40 GMT (14:40 CET, 10:40 local time) on 11 February from Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana atop a Vega rocket. It separated from Vega at an altitude of 340 km and continued up to 412 km. Reentering from this suborbital path, it recorded a vast amount of data from more than 300 advanced and conventional sensors.

As it descended, the five-metre-long, two-tonne craft manoeuvred to decelerate from hypersonic to supersonic speed. The entry speed of 7.5 km/s at an altitude of 120 km created the same conditions as those for a vehicle returning from low Earth orbit.

IXV glided through the atmosphere before parachutes deployed to slow the descent further for a safe splashdown in the Pacific Ocean.

The Mission Control Centre at the ALTEC Advanced Logistics Technology Engineering Centre in Turin, Italy, closely monitored IXV during the mission, receiving flight and instrument data from the entire ground network, including the fixed ground stations in Libreville (Gabon) and Malindi (Kenya), and the station on the Nos Aries recovery ship in the Pacific.

Balloons are now keeping IXV afloat while the recovery vessel hurries to pick it up. It will be returned to Europe for detailed analysis in ESA’s technical centre, ESTEC, in the Netherlands.

Mastering reentry will open a new chapter for ESA. Such a capability is a cornerstone for reusable launcher stages, sample return from other planets and crew return from space, as well as for future Earth observation, microgravity research, satellite servicing and disposal missions.

The initial results from the flight are expected to be released in around six weeks.

The results will feed the Programme for Reusable In-Orbit Demonstrator for Europe, or Pride, which is being studied under funding decided at ESA’s last two Ministerial Councils. The reusable Pride spaceplane would be launched on Europe’s Vega light rocket, orbit and land automatically on a runway.

“IXV has opened a new chapter for ESA in terms of reentry capabilities and reusability,” explains Jean-Jacques Dordain, ESA Director General.

“ESA and its Member States, together with European space industry, are now ready to take up new challenges in several fields of space transportation, in future launchers, robotic exploration or human spaceflight.”

“This mission will teach us a lot about the technologies we need to apply in new launch systems, in particular when we think about reusable systems,” notes Gaele Winters, ESA Director of Launchers.

“This was a short mission with big impact,” notes Giorgio Tumino, IXV project manager.

“The cutting-edge technology we validated today, and the data gathered from the sensors aboard IXV, will open numerous opportunities for Europe to develop ambitious plans in space transportation for a multitude of applications.”

ESA will provide footage of the recovery when it is available from the ship in the Pacific Ocean.

Still pictures will be made available at:
http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Missions/IXV

Ariane Transfer Vehicle or ATV


Designa

tion       

Name

Launch date

ISS docking date

Docking

port

Deorbit date

Sources

ATV-1

Jules Verne

9 March 2008

3 April 2008

Zvezda aft  

29 September 2008


2

ATV-2

Johannes Kepler    

16 February 2011  

24 February 2011  

Zvezda aft

21 June 2011


3

ATV-3

Edoardo Amaldi

23 March 2012

28 March 2012

Zvezda aft

4 October 2012


4

ATV-4

Albert Einstein

5 June 2013

15 June 2013

Zvezda aft

2 November 2013


5

ATV-5

Georges Lemaître

29 July 2014

12 August 2014

Zvezda aft

15 February 2015


ESA budget 2016 by domain



%

Million Euro


1

Earth Observation

30,5

1603,5


2

Launchers

20,0

1051,2


3

Navigation

11,6

609,5


4

Science Core Technology Programme

9,7

507,9


5

Human Spaceflight and Exploration

7,0

365,1


6

Telecommunications

6,8

359,3


7

Basic Activities

4,4

232,1


8

Associated with General Budget

4,1

214,8


9

Robotic Exploration&Prodex

3,7

192,8


10

Technology

1,9

99,5


11

Space Situational Awareness

0,2

12,9


12 

European Cooperating States Agreement 

0,1

4,0




100,0  

5252,6


ESA Budget for 2015/2016

     

Member state                  

ESA convention  

National programme  


Contr.   
(mill. €)

2015

Contr.
(%)

2015

Contr.   
(mill. €)

2016

Contr.
(%)

2016


1

Austria[note 1]

1986-12-30 

FFG


51.5

1.6%

47,6

1,3


2

Belgium[note 2]

1978-10-03

BELSPO


189.5

5.8%

188,9

5,0


3

Czech Republic[note 3]

2008-11-12

Ministry of Transport 


14.2

0.4%

15,6

0.4


4

Denmark[note 2]

1977-09-15

DTU Space


26.8

0.8%

29,5

0,8


5

Estonia[note 3]

2015-02-04

ESO


0.8

0.1%

0,9

0,0


6

Finland [note 3]

1995-01-01

TEKES


19.6

0.6%

21,6

0,6


7

France[note 2]

1980-10-30

CNES


718.2

22.2%

844,5

22,6


8

Germany[note 2]

1977-07-26

DLR


797.4

24.6%

872,6

23,3


9

Greece[note 3]

2005-03-09

ISARS


12.1

0.4%

11.9

0,3


10

Hungary[note 3]

2015-02-24

HSO




5,0

0,1


11

 Ireland[note 1]

1980-12-10

EI


18.0

0.6%

23,3

0,6


12

Italy[note 2]

1978-02-20

ASI


329.9

10.2%

512,0

13,7


13

Luxembourg[note 3] 

2005-06-30

Luxinnovation


23.0

0.7%

22,0

0,6


14

Netherlands[note 2]

1979-02-06

NSO


74.7

2.3%

102,6

2,7


15

Norway[note 1]

1986-12-30

NSC


59.8

1.8%

59,6

1,6


16

Poland[note 3]

2012-11-19

POLSA


30.0

0.9%

29,9

0,8


17

Portugal[note 3]

2000-11-14

FCT


16.7

0.5%

16,0

0,4


18

Romania[note 3]

2011-12-22

ROSA


25.4

0.8%

26,1

0,7


19

Spain[note 2]

1979-02-07

INTA


131.7

4.1%

152,0

4,1


20

Sweden[note 2]

1976-04-06

SNSB


80.3

2.5%

73,9

2,0


21

Switzerland[note 2]

1976-11-19

SSO


134.9

4.2%

146,4

3,9


22

United Kingdom[note 2] 

1978-03-28

UKSA


322.3

9.9%

324,8

8,7



Other


149.8

4.6%

204,4

5,5



Associate members










Canada[note 4]

1979-01-01

CSA


15.5

0.5%

13,2

0,4



Total members and associates




3 241,2

100%

3740,0

100



European Union[note 5]

2004-05-28[27]

ESP

86.5%

1,191.7

36.8%

1 324,8

35,4

87,8


Total ESA




4 433,0

136.8%

5064,8

135,4



EUMETSAT

10.3%

122.4

3.7%

147,9

4,0

9,8


Other income

3.3%

38.8

1.2%

35,6

1,0

2,4


Total



100,0%

 4,594.2  

141.7% 

5248,3   

140,3 

100

Arianespace

Към 01.01.2017

VA234 - Ariane Flight

VV008 - Vega Flight

VS015 - Soyuz Flight

    257 -

Arianespace announces dates

Corporate April 26, 2017
Arianespace announces dates for Flights VS17 and VA237; confirms its goal of 12 launches in 2017 from French Guiana

After having successfully carried out three launches during the first quarter of 2017 with its family of launch vehicles, Ariane, Soyuz and Vega, and scheduled the VA236 Ariane 5 launch on May 4, Arianespace has now announced the dates for the next two missions:

  • VS17, May 18, 2017: a Soyuz launcher will orbit SES-15 for the operator SES.
  • VA237, June 1, 2017: an Ariane 5 ECA launcher will orbit ViaSat-2 and E172B for the operators ViaSat and Eutelsat.

The planning for the six subsequent missions remains unchanged.

Arianespace confirms its objective of carrying out 12 launches in 2017.

Към 01.01.2018

VA241 - Ariane Flight

VV011 - Vega Flight

VS017 - Soyuz Flight

    269 -

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