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Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey(BG)

V-22 Osprey Technical Specifications

PropulsionTwo Rolls-Royce AE1107C, 6,150 shp (4,586 kW) each
LengthFuselage: 57.3 ft. (17.48.20 m); Stowed: 63.0 ft. (19.20 m)
WidthRotors turning: 84.6 ft. (25.78 m); Stowed: 18.4 ft. (5.61 m)
HeightNacelles vertical:22.1 ft.(6.73 m); Stabilizer: 17.9 ft.(5.46 m)
Rotor Diameter38.1 ft (11.6 m)
Vertical Takeoff Max Gross Weight52,600 lbs. (23,859 kg)
Max Cruise Speed270 kts (500 km/h) SL
Mission Radius428 nm – MV-22 Blk C with 24 troops, ramp mounted weapon system, SL STD, 20 min loiter time
Cockpit - crew seats2 MV / 3 CV

Program Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey

The service plans (U.S. Marine Corps) to buy 360 MV-22s( Squadrons). The Air Force wants 50 CV-22s and the Navy still holds a requirement for 48 V-22s to be used as a C-2 Greyhound replacement for the Carrier Onboard Delivery requirement.

The Navy is assessing whether the V-22 can operate efficiently with the carrier air wing on a deck, but another possible candidate is an upgraded Greyhound concept based on the E-2 airframe and pitched by Northrop Grumman.

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey Production and Deliveries

Full-Scale Development Aircraft 6 V-22 FSD

Engineering Manufacturing & Development Aircraft 4 MV-22

LRIP Lot 1 Aircraft (FY1997) 5 MV-22A(5)                                              

LRIP Lot 2 Aircraft (FY1998) 7 MV-22A(12)

LRIP Lot 3 Aircraft (FY1999) 7 MV-22A(19) /to 9 MV-22B(2008)

LRIP Lot 4 Aircraft (FY2000) 11 MV-22B(30)

LRIP Lot 5 Aircraft (FY2001) 9 MV-22B(39)

LRIP Lot 6 Aircraft (FY2002) 9 MV-22B(48)

LRIP Lot 7 Aircraft (FY2003) 11 MV-22B(59)

LRIP Lot 8 Aircraft (FY2004) 9 MV-22B(68)

LRIP Lot 9 Aircraft (FY2005) 8 MV-22B(76)

LRIP Lot 10 Aircraft (FY2006) 12 MV-22B(88)

Lot 11 Aircraft (FY2007) 14 MV-22B(102)

Lot 12 Aircraft (FY2008) 23 MV-22B(125)

Lot 13 Aircraft (FY2009) 30 MV-22C(155)

Lot 14 Aircraft (FY2010) 30 MV-22C(185)

Lot 15 Aircraft (FY2011) 30 MV-22C(215)

Lot 16 Aircraft (FY2012) 30 MV-22C(245)

Lot 17 Aircraft (FY2013) 18 MV-22C(263)  4 CV-22 $1,4

Lot 18 Aircraft (FY2014) 19 MV-22C(282) 3 CV-22

Lot 19 Aircraft (FY2015) 19 MV-22C (301)

Lot 20 Aircraft (FY2016) 19 MV-22C(320) February 26, 2016, 329 (281 MV/48 CV) delivered.                         

Lot 21 Aircraft (FY2017) 16 MV-22C(336) 

Lot 22 Aircraft (FY2018)  6 MV-22C(342)

Lot 23 Aircraft (FY2019)  6 MV-22C(348)

Lot 24 Aircraft (FY2020)  6 MV-22C(354)

Lot 25 Aircraft (FY2021)  14 MV-22C(368)

Lot 26 Aircraft (FY2022)  14 MV-22C(382)

Lot 27 Aircraft (FY2023)  14 MV-22C(396)

Lot 28 Aircraft (FY2024)  6 MV-22C(402)

Lot 29 Aircraft (FY2025)  6 MV-22C(408)

Lot 30 Aircraft (FY2026) -

                                         408

Engineering Manufacturing & Development Aircraft 2 MV-22 to 2 CV-22

LRIP Lot 3 Aircraft (FY1999) 1 MV-22B to 1 CV-22A

LRIP Lot 6 Aircraft (FY2002) 2 CV-22B to 2 CV-22C2)

LRIP Lot 8 Aircraft (FY2004) 2 CV-22B to 2 CV-22C

LRIP Lot 9 Aircraft (FY2005) 3 CV-22B to 3 CV-22C

LRIP Lot 10 Aircraft (FY2006) 2 CV-22B to 1 CV-22C

Lot 11 Aircraft (FY2007) 3 CV-22B to 3 CV-22C

Lot 12 Aircraft (FY2008) 10 CV-22B to 6 CV-22C

Lot 13 Aircraft (FY2009) 6 CV-22B to 6 CV-22C

Lot 14 Aircraft (FY2010) 5 CV-22C

Lot 15 Aircraft (FY2011) 6 CV-22C

Lot 16 Aircraft (FY2012) 5 CV-22C

Lot 17 Aircraft (FY2013) 4 CV-22C 

Lot 18 Aircraft (FY2014) 4 CV-22C 

 Lot 19 Aircraft (FY2015) -

 Lot 20 Aircraft (FY2016) 1 CV-22C(51) February 26, 2016, 329 (281 MV/48 CV) delivered.

 Lot 21 Aircraft (FY2017) -

 Lot 22 Aircraft (FY2018) -

                                              51

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey Deliveries

Program Status and Fast Facts Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey

The first CV-22 was delivered to the USAF in October 2005.

On March 13th 2008 Bell-Boeing delivered the 100th V-22 Osprey. This was the 92nd MV-22(166723) delivered to the US Marines.

On December 9th 2008 the US DoD announced that Bell-Boeing had been awarded a $55 million contract to convert nine MV-22s from Block A to Block B configuration. The work is expected to be completed in May 2009.

The V-22 achieved 100,000 flight hours milestone in March 2011.

On December 29th 2011 the DoD announced that Bell-Boeing had been awarded a $72.9m contract for long-lead items for twenty-one Lot 17 aircraft (17 MV-22, 4 CV-22).

PATUXENT RIVER, Md., Feb. 14, 2012 -- The Bell Boeing V-22 Program, a strategic alliance between The Boeing Company [NYSE: BA] and Bell Helicopter - Textron [NYSE: TXT], today announced that the U.S. Marine Corps has taken delivery of the first MV-22 Osprey produced with the new Block C suite of design upgrades.

"The on-time, on-budget delivery of our first Block C aircraft is the latest milestone in our ongoing quest to make the world’s most revolutionary aircraft even more advanced," said John Rader, executive director of the Bell Boeing V-22 Program. "Block C Ospreys will meet our current customers' enduring need for the latest mission capabilities, while presenting an even more compelling value proposition to future domestic and international customers."

The V-22 Block C design upgrade includes a new weather radar system that improves navigation in poor weather conditions, and a redesigned Environmental Conditioning System to enhance aircrew and troop comfort. Expanded capacity and effectiveness built into the Electronic Warfare system -- including additional chaff/flare dispensers -- increases the Osprey’s ability to defeat air-to-air and ground-to-air threats. The Block C also provides greater situational awareness with enhanced cockpit and cabin displays.

“We continue to increase the capabilities of this first-of-type tiltrotor, and Block C is the latest, evolutionary step,” said Marine Corps Col. Greg Masiello, Joint V-22 Program Manager, Naval Air Systems Command. “Whether it's the addition of weather radar, upgrades to the environmental control system, or improvements for situational awareness, Block C brings enhanced capability to V-22 pilots, maintainers, and crew members throughout the aircraft’s life cycle."


On June 21st 2012 the USAF placed a $74m order for a CV-22 to replace the one that crashed  nr Qalat, Afghanistan in 09 Apr 2010 (06-0031 D1012  CV-22B 8th SOS / ISAF) replace (11-0055 D1042 CV-22 8th SOS)

To date(Jun 17, 2013), 214 MV-22s have been delivered to the Marine Corps.

“That means Israel will get six V-22s out of the next order to go on the assembly line.” Oct 31, 2013

In 2014 the V22 Osprey passed 250,000 hours of flight time in service.

In 2014 has seen the 300th V22 delivered (between the USMC and USAF).

MV-22: US$72.1 million (flyaway cost for FY2015)

Internationally Japan is now first in line to receive the V22 for their military, with 5 aircraft slated for delivery in 2018, pending a LOI that is expected in April, approximately at the start of the Japanese budget year.

First Block C Configured MV-22 Osprey Takes Flight, Undergoes Climate Tests

by Andrew H. Lee

On May 13 at Naval Air Warfare Center Patuxent River, Maryland, the first Block C modified MV-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft successfully completed its first test flight.  The event signified the most important in a series of recent achievements in the Bell Boeing V-22 program's progress towards bringing the mission enhancements of the Block C suite to the U.S Marine Corps (USMC) MV-22 and U.S. Air Force Special Operations CV-22 Osprey aircraft.  

"This first flight milestone represents a significant step in improving our customers' capabilities for future missions," said John Thatcher, V-22 Block C Chief Engineer.  "Block C production deliveries are right around the corner and this first flight demonstrates a significant reduction in our production risk," he said.

According to Don Byrne, Boeing V-22 Flight Test Team, May's first flight test lasted just over one hour and consisted of successful ground testing for Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC), flight testing for Functional Check Flight (FCF) to verify proper aircraft systems operation after the modification period, and initial shakedown flight testing of the new Joint Application System Software (JASS).

Following the initial flight tests, the modified Osprey paid a June visit the McKinley Climatic Test Chamber at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida to conduct performance testing of the new upgraded Block C Environmental Control System (ECS).

"The performance of the new ECS was evaluated at temperature extremes ranging from +125° F down to -61° F, and the engineers were very pleased with the results," said Mark Hollady, V-22 Lead Flight Test Engineer, who led a team comprised of Boeing, Bell, Military, Government and DynCorp personnel in conducting the climate tests.

The flight test period will continue through November, 2010.  Production of new-build Block C aircraft began in April 2010 in Philadelphia, with first delivery to the Air Force targeted for December 2011 and USMC scheduled for January 2012

The MV-22 Block C upgrade incorporates weather radar for MV-22 only, an improved environmental control system for CV-22 and MV-22 variants, troop commander situational awareness display for MV-22, upgraded standby flight instrument and GPS repeater for MV and CV, and additional chaff/flare equipment into the MV-22 aircraft. Block C development first began in 2006 and subsequently, in November 2009, Bell Boeing was awarded a $105 million Block C production contract modification to produce 91 MV-22 and 21 CV-22 Ospreys in the configuration. 

At press time Bell Boeing is in the process of submitting a proposal in response to an Air Force Request for Proposal (RFP) to retrofit the CV-22 aircraft with the Block C design. 

Bell Boeing Delivers 1st Block C V-22 Osprey to US Marine Corps

Latest Osprey variant features new weather radar, improvements to electronic warfare systems, situational awareness and aircrew comfort

PATUXENT RIVER, Md., Feb. 14, 2012 -- The Bell Boeing V-22 Program, a strategic alliance between The Boeing Company [NYSE: BA] and Bell Helicopter - Textron [NYSE: TXT], today announced that the U.S. Marine Corps has taken delivery of the first MV-22 Osprey produced with the new Block C suite of design upgrades.

"The on-time, on-budget delivery of our first Block C aircraft is the latest milestone in our ongoing quest to make the world’s most revolutionary aircraft even more advanced," said John Rader, executive director of the Bell Boeing V-22 Program. "Block C Ospreys will meet our current customers' enduring need for the latest mission capabilities, while presenting an even more compelling value proposition to future domestic and international customers."

The V-22 Block C design upgrade includes a new weather radar system that improves navigation in poor weather conditions, and a redesigned Environmental Conditioning System to enhance aircrew and troop comfort. Expanded capacity and effectiveness built into the Electronic Warfare system -- including additional chaff/flare dispensers -- increases the Osprey’s ability to defeat air-to-air and ground-to-air threats. The Block C also provides greater situational awareness with enhanced cockpit and cabin displays.

“We continue to increase the capabilities of this first-of-type tiltrotor, and Block C is the latest, evolutionary step,” said Marine Corps Col. Greg Masiello, Joint V-22 Program Manager, Naval Air Systems Command. “Whether it's the addition of weather radar, upgrades to the environmental control system, or improvements for situational awareness, Block C brings enhanced capability to V-22 pilots, maintainers, and crew members throughout the aircraft’s life cycle."

About the V-22 Osprey Program:

The V-22 Osprey is a joint service, multirole combat aircraft that uses tiltrotor technology to combine the vertical performance of a helicopter with the speed and range of a fixed-wing aircraft. With its nacelles and rotors in vertical position, it can take off, land and hover like a helicopter. Once airborne, its nacelles can be rotated to transition the aircraft to a turboprop airplane capable of high-speed, high-altitude flight.

More than 160 Osprey tiltrotors are currently in operation and the worldwide fleet has amassed more than 130,000 flight hours, with nearly half of those hours logged in the past two years.

Safety, survivability and mission efficiency have become hallmarks of the operational fleet. According to Naval Safety Center records, the MV-22 has the lowest Class A mishap rate of any tactical rotorcraft in the Marine Corps during the past decade. Navy flight-hour cost data also show that the Osprey has the lowest cost per seat-mile (cost to transport one person over a distance of one mile) of any U.S. naval transport rotorcraft over the past two years.

About Bell Boeing:

Bell Helicopter, a wholly owned subsidiary of Textron Inc., is an industry-leading producer of commercial and military, manned and unmanned vertical lift aircraft and the pioneer of the revolutionary tiltrotor aircraft. Globally recognized for world-class customer service, innovation and superior quality, Bell's global workforce serves customers flying Bell aircraft in more than 120 countries. Textron Inc. is a multi-industry company that leverages its global network of aircraft, defense, industrial and finance businesses to provide customers with innovative solutions and services. Textron is known around the world for its powerful brands such as Bell Helicopter, Cessna Aircraft Company, Jacobsen, Kautex, Lycoming, E-Z-GO, Greenlee, Textron Systems and Textron Financial Corporation. More information is available at www.textron.com.

A unit of The Boeing Company, Boeing Defense, Space & Security is one of the world's largest defense, space and security businesses specializing in innovative and capabilities-driven customer solutions, and the world’s largest and most versatile manufacturer of military aircraft. Headquartered in St. Louis, Boeing Defense, Space & Security is a $32 billion business with 63,000 employees worldwide. Follow us on Twitter: @BoeingDefense.

MV-22 Hard Landing in Hawaii
May / 17 / 2015
USS ESSEX —
One Marine was killed when an MV-22 Osprey from the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit experienced a hard-landing mishap while conducting training aboard  Marine Corps Training Area – Bellows at approximately 11:40 a.m., Hawaii time. 
Twenty-two Marines were aboard at the time, and all other 21 have been transported to local hospitals for assessment and treatment.
The Marines were conducting routine sustainment training at the time. The 15th MEU departed San Diego May 10 on a seven-month deployment to the Pacific Command and Central Command areas of operation. 
The cause of the incident is under investigation.
  • United States Air Force

    • 7th Special Operations Squadron  RAF Mildenhall, United Kingdom

    • 8th Special Operations Squadron Hurlburt Field, Florida

    • 20th Special Operations Squadron Cannon AFB

    • 71st Special Operations Squadron Kirtland AFB, New Mexico

    • 418th Flight Test Squadron Edwards AFB, California.

    • march 16, 2016 50 CV-22
  • United States Marine Corps

    • Marine Medium Tiltrotor Training Squadron 204(VMMT-204) "Raptors" MCAS New River, North Carolina 28 MV-22
    • Marine Helicopter Squadron 1(HMX-1) "The Nighthawks" MC Air Facility Quantico, Virginia                       12 MV-22
    • Marine Operational Test and Evaluation Squadron 22(VMX-22)"Argonauts" MCAS New River, North Car.     MV-22
    • Air Test and Evaluation Squadron 21 (HX-21) "Blackjack" NAS Patuxent River, Maryland                               MV-22

    • Operations Squadron 17
    • VMM-161 "Greyhawks"        MCAS Miramar, California               12 MV-22  In December 2009
    • VMM-162 "Golden Eagles"   MCAS New River, North Carolina    12 MV-22  on December 9, 2005
    • VMM-163 "Ridge Runners"   MCAS Miramar, California               12 MV-22
    • VMM-164 "Knightriders"       MCAS Camp Pendleton, California 12 MV-22  on April 9, 2015
    • VMM-165 "White Knights"    MCAS Miramar, California               12 MV-22  on March 1, 2011
    • VMM-166 "SeaElk"                MCAS Miramar, California               12 MV-22 on June 23, 2010
    • VMM-261 "Raging Bulls"       MCAS New River, North Carolina    12 MV-22  on April 10, 2008
    • VMM-262 "Flying Tigers"      MCAS Futenma, Okinawa, Japan    12 MV-22  On 30 September 2013
    • VMM-263 "Thunder Eagles"  MCAS New River, North Carolina    12 MV-22 on June 3, 2005,
    • VMM-264 "Black Knights"     MCAS New River, North Carolina    12 MV-22 in April 2009
    • VMM-265  "Dragons"           MCAS Futenma, Okinawa, Japan    12 MV-22
    • VMM-266  "Fighting Griffins" MCAS New River, North Carolina    12 MV-22
    • VMM-268  "Red Dragons"     MCAS Miramar, California               12 MV-22
    • VMM-363  "Lucky Red Lions" MCAS Miramar, California              12 MV-22  10 May`12 at MCAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii
    • VMM-364 "Purple Foxes"      MCAS Camp Pendleton, California  12 MV-22 On October 9, 2014
    • VMM-365 "Blue Knights"       MCAS New River, North Carolina    12 MV-22 on Jan. 15, 2009/On 27 April 2013 to Moron
    • VMM-764 "Moonlight"           MCAS Miramar, California               12 MV-22
    • VMM-
MARINE CORPS AIR FACILITY QUANTICO, Va. -- Marine Helicopter Squadron One Marines, past and present, family members and friends mingle on the flight line with the newest addition to the squadron, a MV-22 B ‘Osprey,’ after a MV-22B(168280) Introduction Ceremony in the HMX-1 hangar on May 4, 2013. HMX-1 is scheduled to receive 11 more MV-22B by next summer.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Rebekka S. Heite/Released)



00

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

11

12

13

14

22

23

Total

HMX-1

MX 

0000 

8280 

8284 

8289 

8292 

8297 

8302

8306 

8324 

8327 

8332 

8335 

8339 

0000 

0000 

0000 

0000

12

VMX-22

MV

8214

8215


6726












6391 

6480


VMMT-204 

GX


6390 

5942




5945












HX-21


8301






































VMM

161   

162   

163   

164   

165   

166   

261   

262   

263   

264   

265   

266   

268   

363   

364   

365   

764   



YR

YS

YP

YT

YW

YX

EM

ET

EG

EH

EP

ES

YQ

YZ

PF

YM

ML


00 

8033

8303

8011

8011

8281

7917

7919


7906

8300


6687

5842

8008


8305



01

8020

6741



8026

8352


8287

5953


8217

8227



5951

6731



02

8336



8022

8328


8351

8283




8228

8322



6718



03

8343

6688

8234

8234

8030

7922

8004


6734

6689



8342

8008





04

8294




8285







6685

8344






05

7920

8231


7911


8009

6737


7913



8229




6722



06

8016

5846


7914


8013


8006



8027


5943

8237





07

7916



7903

8337



8240

6492

8333



8350



5840



08




8031


8345










8330



09

8018







8232



8032

6719







10

8026

5849



8338

8010


8237




5841


8286





11

8025



8304

7905


5844









7912



12

8029



8242


8024


8012




8222


8334





13


8291







7915

8225






5944



14

8296

8293


6736


8244




8323









15






8235






8326


8290





16






8236



8238










Total

12

8

1

12

8

11

5

7

7

5

3

9

6

6

1

8


109


12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

204

300th Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey

       Според официално съобщение от американската компания Textron(собственик на Bell Helicopter) през 2014 година е предаден 300-ят конвертоплан Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey.

Извън употреба машини V-22 Osprey




Full-Scale Development Aircraft 6 V-22 FSD

Note

1   

163911  

D0001  

Ff 19 Mar 89. Preserved at MCAS New River, NC 90001


2

163912

D0002

Ff 09 Aug 89. Retired from flight test and used for live fire testing. Scrapped 1999


3

163913

D0003

Ff 06 May 1990. Preserved at the American Helicopter Museum, West Chester, PA


4

163914

D0004

First flight 21 Dec 1989. Crashed near MCAS Quantico, VA, 20 Jul 1992


5

163915

D0005

Crashed on first flight 11 Jun 1991


6

163916

D0006

Not completed. Used for live fire testing





Engineering Manufacturing & Development Aircraft 4 MV-22


7

164942

D0010

Ff 16 Jan 1998. Arr Pax River Jan 29th 1998. EMD flight test. Grounded mid-2000 as maintenance trainer





LRIP Lot 1 Aircraft (FY1997) 5 MV-22B


8

165433

D0011

Ff30 Apr 1999. Del 14 May 1999. Arr Pax River 27 May 1999. Landed heavily 08 Apr 2000 at Marana Northwest Regional Airport, AZ. Struck off charge 16 Jul 2001.


9

165436

D0014

Del 17 Jan 2000. Crashed 08 Apr 2000 at Marana Northwest Regional Airport, AZ.


10

165437

D0015

Del 12 Mar 2000. GIA at New River. Landed heavily





LRIP Lot 2 Aircraft (FY1998) 7 MV-22B


11

165438

D0016

Del 30 Jul 2000. GIA at New River. Crashed


12

165440

D0018

Del 21 Aug 2000. Crashed 11 Dec 2000, near MCAS New River, NC.


13

165441

D0019

Del 15 Oct 2000. GIA at NAS Pensacola, FL. Scrapped 2010


14

165442

D0020

Del 06 Nov 2000. NAVAIRSYSCOM, New River. Scrapped 2010


15

165444

D0022

Del 16 Jan 2003. NAS Patuxent River. Scrapped 2010





LRIP Lot 3 Aircraft (FY1999) 11MV-22B


16

165839

D0025

Arr Philadelphia 06 Oct 2003 for conversion to CV-22. Delivered to Edwards AFB 26 Feb 2005. May also be serialled as 99-0021, Dec13 2013 preserved at USAF National Museum, Dayton, Ohio


17

165844

D0030

MCAS New River. Crashed Morocco 11 Apr 2012 (confirmation needed)





LRIP Lot 6 Aircraft (FY2002) 11MV-22B


18

166389

D0056

Del to VMX-22 04 Feb 2005. MCAS New River. Crashed 27 Mar 2006





LRIP Lot 7 Aircraft (FY2003) 11MV-22B


19

166482

D0061

MCAS New River. Scrapped 2010





LRIP Lot 10 Aircraft (FY2006) 16 MV-22B


20

166735

D0100

MCAS New River. w/o 21 Jun13 VMM-365 burned after landing at Dare County





Lot 12 Aircraft (FY2008) 21 MV-22


21

168020

D0150

w/o 17 May 15 VMM-161 /YR-01 hard landing in Bellows Air Force+





Lot 14 Aircraft (FY2010) 30 MV-22


22

168241

D0191

Jan`13 w/o 26 Aug 13 VMM-163 hard landing while executing reduced










LRIP Lot 10 Aircraft (FY2006) 2 CV-22B


23

06-0031

D1012

Accepted by AFSOC 15 Jan 2008. Crashed nr Qalat, Afghanistan 09 Apr 2010. Had flown 740.3 hours.


24

06-0032

D1013

13 jun12. 8th SOS crash on the Eglin Range, north of Nava







Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force - Crisis Response (SPMAGTF-CR)

On 27 April 2013, 6 MV-22B Ospreys and 2 KC-130Js flew from Marine Corps Air Station, New River, North Carolina to Moron De La Frontera, Spain, where they joined other command-and-control assets and support staff to make up the aviation command element (ACE) for SPMAGTF-CR. The MV-22Bs came from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 365 (VMM-365), while the KC-130Js came from Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 252 (VMGR-252). The transit of the MV-22Bs from the United States to Spain was the longest and largest transatlantic flight of any Osprey squadron up to that time. The MV-22B Ospreys wee a key component of SPMAGTF-CR, being capable of completing a 325-nautical mile flight with 20-24 combat equipped personnel without an aerial refuel or auxiliary fuel tanks.

Spain makes U.S. rapid force at Morón base permanent

Spain makes U.S. rapid force at Morón base permanent
The Associated Press 9:30 a.m. EDT May 29, 2015

MADRID — The Spanish government has approved an accord permanently granting the U.S. military a presence at a southwestern base as a center for a rapid reaction force to deal with crises in Africa.

The deal approved by Spain's Cabinet on Friday allows for the U.S. to station up to 3,000 troops at Morón Air Base, up from a current 850. The number of aircraft at the base can be increased from 14 to 40.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is to visit Madrid on Sunday and Monday to sign the agreement.

Under a 1988 bilateral agreement, accords permitting U.S. presence at the base have been renewed annually. The new agreement needs to be approved by Spain's Parliament.

Приблизителна оценка за наличните летящи Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey

        Около началото на месец май 2015 година в U.S. Marine Corps и U.S. Air Force има около 300 летящи Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey.
        В 17 оперативни ескадрили на U.S. Marine Corps има около 200 машини при щат 204 или те са почти окомплектовани. Освен това към U.S. Marine Corps има учебна ескадрила с около 28 машини и изследователска с около 6 машини, както и VIP ескадрила с 12 конвертоппана. Общото количество е 246 машини и като добавим загубените или бракувани 22 стават около 276 машини. Тук трябва да добавим и вероятно още 6 намиращи се в изследователска ескадрила Air Test and Evaluation Squadron 21 (HX-21) "Blackjack" NAS Patuxent River, Maryland  към U.S. Navy или стават най-малко 282. Възможно е да сме пропуснали една или повече MV-22.
       В 4 оперативни ескадрили на U.S. Air Force има около 40 CV-22 плюс още най-малко две в 418th Flight Test Squadron Edwards AFB, California и две загубени.
       Ако обобщим за U.S. Marine Corps и U.S. Air Force има около 240 оперативни машини, 12 VIP, 28 учебни и най-малко 14 тестови и изследователски или общо най-малко 294 летящи.
      Според някои данни щатът на 17 оперативните ескадрили на U.S. Marine Corps(204 машини) е запълнен и има още 2-4 машини или общо летящите към 1 май 2015 година Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey са най-малко 300.
       Произведени са най-малко 324 Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey, като около 24 вече са извън употреба.
       В началото на програмата бяха заложени 458 машини(U.S. Marine Corps 360 MV-22s, U.S. Air Force 50 CV-22s and  U.S. Navy 48 V-22s) за САЩ. Сега става ясно, че ще бъдат произведени повече, поради големия брой излезли от употреба машини.

Navy Decides to Buy V-22 Ospreys for Carrier Delivery

By Richard Whittle on January 13, 2015 at 11:13 AM

The Navy will buy V-22 Osprey tiltrotors to replace its aging C-2A Greyhound turboprop aircraft in flying carrier on board delivery (COD) missions. Breaking Defense obtained a Jan. 5 memo, signed by Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert, and Marine Corps Commandant Gen. Joseph Dunford. It stipulates that the Navy will buy four V-22s each year from fiscal 2018 to 2020.

The MOU marks a major triumph for the Naval Air Systems Command V-22 program office, the Marine Corps and other Osprey advocates, who have argued for years that the Navy should replace its aging conventional take off C-2As with vertical take off and landing V-22s.

“The Navy is responsible for modifying these V-22s into an HV-22 configuration for the COD mission,” the  MOU states. “The parties agree that subsequent documents will provide details on the concept of operations and milestones. A memorandum of agreement will detail reimbursable Marine Corps support for the Navy’s HV-22 transition, which includes training and potential deployment of Marine MV-22 aircraft and personnel to support COD requirements.”

The Navy-Marine Corps agreement must be ratified in the next defense budget and by Congress. It also depends in part on a prospective third V-22 multiyear procurement contract that would begin in fiscal year 2018.  C-2A maker Northrop Grumman has proposed building a modernized version incorporating features of the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye tactical early warning aircraft.

The twin-engine turboprop C-2As carry cargo, mail and passengers between aircraft carriers and shore — a mission called COD for “carrier on-board delivery.” The first Greyhound prototypes flew in 1964.The Osprey, built in a 50-50 partnership by Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. and Boeing Co. and in service with the Marine Corps since 2007 and the Air Force since 2009, tilts two large wingtip rotors up to take off and land vertically and forward to fly like a turboprop airplane, giving it far greater speed and range than conventional helicopters.

The MOU signed by Mabus, Greenert and Dunford marks a milestone in the history of the revolutionary V-22, which began in the early 1980s at the behest of Navy Secretary John Lehman but took a quarter century to get into service. The Navy was originally supposed to buy as many as 380 Ospreys for search and rescue and antisubmarine warfare missions, but after Lehman left office, the service cut its paper requirement for V-22s to 48. The Marines are acquiring 360 Ospreys and the Air Force Special Operations Command another 50. As of March, the program office reported that 257 of a planned 460 Ospreys, including two for research, development, test and evaluation, had been acquired. Under the latest multiyear contract, which ends in fiscal 2017, the “flyaway cost” for each Osprey is about $68 million.

Until the past couple of years, Navy leaders had shown little interest in actually buying their planned 48 Ospreys. But in 2011, the Marine Corps began qualifying its MV-22s for carrier landings, and a six-day “military utility assessment” conducted last summer off the coast of Florida, in which V-22s carried passengers and cargo to and from the USS Harry S Truman (CVN 75), found that: “The V-22 demonstrated an effective, flexible, and safe capability to conduct the COD mission with no modifications and no adverse impact to cyclic flight operations.”

Navy and Marine Corps commanders of Amphibious Ready Groups carrying Marine Expeditionary Units, meanwhile, have found that using the Osprey to carry passengers and cargo among the standard ARG complement of three vessels enables the ships to conduct separate operations at ranges far greater than possible when CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters were their primary supply aircraft.

Under the Jan. 5 MOU, the first dozen HV-22s would be taken from what would have been the Marine Corps share of V-22s built in fiscal 2018-20 under the prospective third multiyear contract. Those first Navy V-22s will be replaced in the Marine Corps inventory in fiscal years 2021, 2022, and 2023 with a dozen Ospreys “that would have been allocated to the Navy,” the memo provides

Japan's plan to buy 17 V-22 Osprey aircraft moves forward

May. 08, 2015

WASHINGTON

Japan’s plan to buy V-22 tilt-rotor aircraft built by Boeing Co and Textron Inc’s Bell Helicopter unit moved forward this week with a formal notification to the U.S. Congress about the $3 billion deal.

The Pentagon’s Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA), which oversees foreign arms sales, notified lawmakers that the State Department has approved Japan’s plan to buy 17 V-22 aircraft, or Ospreys, 40 engines built by Britain’s Rolls Royce Holdings Plc and associated equipment.

The Bell-Boeing team said it would continue to work with the U.S. government to facilitate the sale, but referred questions about the timing of the deal to the U.S. Navy.

The DSCA said the proposed sale would help Japan modernize its transport fleet and enhance its ability to carry out humanitarian and disaster relief missions, and support amphibious operations.

U.S. lawmakers have 30 days to block the sale although no such action is expected in this case.

The plan was first unveiled in November

Marines awarded for returning MV-22 Osprey to flight status

2

Jul

2015

Twenty-four Marines with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron(VMM)166, VMM-268 and VMM-364 received awards for their part in successfully returning a MV-22 Osprey into flight status aboard Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, California, June 25.

The participating Marines received Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medals, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals or Certificates of Commendation from Maj. Gen. Michael Rocco, commanding general of the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing.

“These Marines were awarded because they took an MV-22B Osprey, the most in demand aircraft that we have in the Department of Defense, and returned another one into flight operations, which fills a big hole,” said Rocco.

For 278 days, the Osprey just took up space in the VMM-166 hangar until maintenance chiefs from multiple squadrons aboard the air station decided to get to work on returning it the sky.

The chiefs assembled a team of Marines from VMM-166, VMM-268 and VMM-364 who reintroduced the aircraft to the operational lineup.

Rocco said it was not the fact that the Marines brought an out-of-commission aircraft back into flight operations but, more importantly, that multiple units came together to do so.

According to Staff Sgt. Travis Borkowski, a maintenance chief with VMM-166, it is not common to rebuild an aircraft because most of them don’t get to that stage in order for a rebuild to be necessary.

It was not required for the squadrons to fix the Osprey, but Borkowski said, “It’s an aircraft. Its home is the sky and it needs to fly.”

As a result of their combined efforts, the Osprey passed the Standard Functional Flight Check, took a group of VIPs to the USS America and carried 121 Marines and more than 9000 pounds of equipment in support of Integrated Training Exercise 3-15 in Twentynine Palms, California.

“I am hugely proud of these Marines,” said Rocco. “They represent the best and brightest that we’ve got.”

On Oct. 1 last year, the crew on board a MV-22B(168234, VMM-163/YP-03) attempted to take off from USS Makin Island for a mission to reinforce the U.S. Embassy in Iraq. Unfortunately, the flight never made it to Iraq and the aircraft was nearly lost.(06/25/2015 for 268 days)

Bell Boeing Announces Contract for First V-22 Ospreys to Japan

Jul 14, 2015
  • Agreement enhances Japan’s defensive and humanitarian operations
  • Marks first international sale for V-22

PATUXENT RIVER, Md.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Bell Boeing, a strategic alliance between Bell Helicopter, a Textron [NYSE: TXT] company, and Boeing [NYSE: BA], was awarded a U.S. Navy contract today for five Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft to be delivered to Japan, marking the first sale of the aircraft through the U.S. government’s foreign military sales program.

The contract for the Block C aircraft includes support, training, and equipment. The versatile V-22 tiltrotor will allow Japan’s Ground Self-Defense Force greatly enhanced capabilities, while providing an ideal platform for relief efforts in response to natural disasters.

“The Bell Boeing team is honored to have Japan as the first international customer for the V-22 tiltrotor,” said Mitch Snyder, executive vice president of Military Business for Bell Helicopter. “The distinct performance envelope of the V-22 will provide Japan with an ideal solution when the need arises. When assets are required on-target in a location without an airstrip, the self-deployable Osprey provides customers with an unrivaled combination of speed, range, and payload to execute a variety of missions.”

The V-22 is currently in service with the United States Marine Corps and the United States Air Force Special Operations Command. This year, the United States Navy announced their decision to procure 44 V-22 aircraft.

“This is an important day for the Bell Boeing team in Japan and for the U.S.-Japan Alliance,” said Shelley Lavender, president of Boeing Military Aircraft. “The V-22 redefines what’s operationally possible for a country, and we’re looking forward to delivering this capability to Japan as we continue our enduring partnership there.”

The Osprey’s mission capabilities include troop transport, disaster relief, personnel recovery, medical evacuation, logistics support, and executive transport.

Допълнение

Според източници от Япония сделката е на стойност 41 милиарда йени (332,5 милиона долара) за 5 машини.

Green Hornet crew receives highest aerial honors

27th Special Operations Wing Public Affairs
Story by Staff Sgt. Matthew Plew

        CANNON AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. - The Cannon military flying community, leaders, family and local supporters gathered in Hanger 196 to recognize a group of heroes who risked their lives in combat late last year to save the lives of others, Oct. 16.
Capt. Jonathan Seagle, Capt. John Vandenbemden, Staff Sgt. Spencer Seymore and Staff Sgt. Daniel Teel, members of the 20th Special Operations Squadron, received the Distinguished Flying Cross and Air Medal with Valor from Lt. Gen. Bradley A. Heithold,        Commander Air Force Special Operations Command, for their rapid airpower response to an enemy attack on American forces Dec. 5, 2014.
"On the night of Dec. 5, we got an opportunity to display the full capability of the 20th SOS, and we did,” stated Heithold. “I am humbled to share this stage with these fine Air Commandos.”
While deployed, the CV-22 crew responded to a special operations assault force that had come under heavy fire from enemy combatants. Their timely actions led to the successful evacuation of critically-wounded ground personnel.
"This is a great honor,” said Seagle. “Any member of the 20th would have done the exact same thing. We are all very humbled.”
According to the citation, Seagle and Vandenbemden quickly identified access and exit routes, and plotted potential unplanned landing zones in the area. Undeterred by the intensity of enemy and friendly fires, Seagle and Vandenbemden identified the special operations team, cleared the landing zone and provided critical radio approach calls that led to flawless execution of an extremely difficult 80-foot restricted-visibility landing.
At the same time, Teel analyzed the aircraft’s systems and quickly determined that the CV-22 would be overweight, which would jeopardize the mission. He immediately initiated dumping procedures to ensure the crew had adequate power for a safe approach and takeoff. Meanwhile, Seymore manned the .50 caliber weapons system while ensuring safety and providing approach calls for a successful dust out landing. Once on the ground, Seymore departed the aircraft, exposing himself to enemy fire in order to aid in loading the critically wounded.
The crew ensured all patients were securely loaded despite receiving distress calls that they were taking direct fire from the enemy, according to the citation. During their flight from the objective, they continued to perform evasive maneuvers, using the terrain for cover, which enabled them to safely depart the area.
Once clear of danger, the crew coordinated critical aerial refueling to guarantee the safe transport of the wounded to a U. S. Navy vessel for immediate surgery. Upon reaching the vessel, they achieved a first: performing a CV-22 shipboard contingency landing.
“The individual and team effort made by these men speaks to the character of our Air Commandos,” said Col. Ben Maitre, 27th Special Operations Wing commander. “This is a great moment for the 20th, Cannon and for AFSOC.”
Editor’s note: Congress authorized the Distinguished Flying Cross July 2, 1926, to award any U.S. military member who exhibits heroism or extraordinary achievement while participating in an aerial fight against an enemy of the United States. The Air Medal was authorized May 11, 1942, to award anyone who, while serving in any capacity in or with U.S. Armed Forces, distinguishes himself or herself by meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight.

Marines fly Osprey from Miramar to Brazil, set record

By Lance M. Bacon,
Staff writer 10:16 a.m. EST November 18, 2015

The Marine Corps set a new distance record for Osprey flights on Tuesday as three MV-22Bs traveled from California to Brazil.

Flight crews from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 764 flew 6,165 miles from Marine Corps Air Station Miramar to Rio de Janeiro. The Marines made the journey as part of UNITAS Amphibious 2015, a nine-day multinational maritime exercise that runs through Nov. 24. About 1,000 troops from Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Paraguay and Peru are participating.

The Osprey squadron made a five-leg flight that included stops in Trinidad and Tobago, and Brazil, said 1st Lt. Tyler Hopkins, a UNITAS spokesman. The three Ospreys were supported by three KC-130J Hercules tankers from Marine Aerial Refueler Squadron 234 and one KC-130 from Marine Aerial Refueler Squadron 452.

The flight took five days as leadership decided to wait out some bad weather, said Lt. Col. Greg Gehman, commander of the VMM-764 Moonlighters. Lessons learned from the long flight will lead to faster and more efficient responses, and help to better prepare flight crews for crossing international boundaries and dealing with environmental concerns, he said.

Such challenges were evident when Special-Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force Crisis Response was called into action in January 2014 to help evacuate the U.S. Embassy in Juba, South Sudan. The team, based out of Morón, Spain, flew nearly 4,200 miles (roughly the distance from Anchorage, Alaska, to Miami) to pull more than 20 embassy personnel out of the country amid violence between factions on the brink of civil war.

The necessity of aerial refueling for the Osprey was a key part of the mission, and the KC-130 Super Hercules allowed the crisis response Marines to travel quickly to the site, conduct a speedy mission and prevent a potential catastrophe.

The Ospreys will lead helicopter operations for UNITAS Amphibious Operations 2015, and will be assisted by Brazil and Mexico. (Photo: Screen grab from Marine video by Cpl Bethany Barnoski)

That is not to say the Osprey hasn’t been extending its reach. Six Ospreys and two KC-130Js in April 2013 flew from Marine Corps Air Station New River, North Carolina, to Moron De La Frontera, Spain. That 15-hour flight marked the longest and largest transatlantic flight of any Osprey squadron to date.

Four months later, two Ospreys completed the longest MV-22 tanking mission in the Pacific. The Marines flying those aircraft took off from Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Japan, and landed in Townsville, Australia.

In South America, the Ospreys will lead helicopter operations for UNITAS, and will be assisted by Brazil and Mexico. Members of 23rd Marines, 4th Civil Affairs Group and 4th Marine Logistics Group will also participate in the exercise.

During the exercise, the troops will conduct military operations in urban terrain and live-fire exercises. A final amphibious and humanitarian assistance/disaster relief exercise is set for Nov. 19 at Ihla de Marambaia.

"Exercises like UNITAS Amphib provide real world scenarios for Reserve Marines to train in," Hopkins said. "This allows them the ability to seamlessly integrate with their active duty counterparts and maintain readiness and fosters friendly cooperation and understanding among all participating forces."

V-22 Navy Variant receives official designation

Feb 3, 2016

Naval Air Systems Command

NAS Patuxent River, Md.

In February 2015, the Navy announced the Carrier Onboard Delivery, commonly referred to as COD, platform of the future would be a maritime variant of the V-22 Osprey.  Until recently, that aircraft was referred to as the Navy variant. Now, that V-22 has an official designation: CMV-22B.

The main mission of the COD platform is to provide the Joint Force Maritime Component Commander with time-critical, long-range aerial logistics support by transporting personnel, mail and priority cargo from advance bases to the sea base. The CMV-22B will be the same as the MV-22B with three additions.  It will include an extended-range fuel system, a high-frequency radio and a public address system.

Currently, the Navy has planned for a total of 44 CMV-22B aircraft to be purchased.  Production is expected to begin in fiscal 2018 and deliveries of the aircraft will begin in 2020.

Executive Summary

December 2015 SAR

The V-22 Program focus is on improving aircraft readiness, sustaining Fleet aircraft, delivery of Multi-Year 2 production aircraft, reducing operating costs, and expanding our business base, both domestically and internationally. Both the MV-22 and CV-22 continue to meet all Key Performance Parameters. APB cost performance remains within established thresholds.

Production has completed on 17 of 27 planned aircraft production lots. As of February 26, 2016, 329 (281 MV/48 CV) aircraft have been delivered. To support program affordability, the Program is currently pursuing a third Multi-Year Procurement (MYP) contract for FY 2018-FY 2022. On the V-22 MYP 2 Contract with Bell-Boeing, the Lot 20 full-funding modification was awarded for $1.184B on October 26, 2015 and $38.6M of Advance Procurement funding for Lot 21 was awarded on November 24, 2015.

The Navy variant of the V-22 in support of the Carrier Onboard Delivery mission will begin development in FY 2016. The initial Navy Non-Recurring Engineering/Engineering Change Proposal delivery order is expected to award in second quarter FY 2016. Production of the Navy variant V-22 will begin in FY 2018.

The Program Office awarded a $332M modification to the MYP 2 Contract with Bell-Boeing in July 2015 to provide for the manufacture and delivery of five MV-22 tilt rotor aircraft in support of the Government of Japan. On September 25, 2015, adelivery order was awarded with Bell-Boeing for $20.9M to complete Non-Recurring Engineering for Japan-specific aircraft modifications. It is expected that a second Letter of Offer and Acceptance (LOA) will be in place by June 2016 for up to 12additional aircraft, for a total of 17 aircraft for Japan.

The Operational Utility Evaluation (OUE) of the new Mission Computer and Color Helmet Mounted Display systems on the CV-22 began on December 8, 2015, and was completed on February 11, 2016.

There are no significant software-related issues with the program at this time.

March 21, 2016

Fiscal year 2016

March 1/16: The USAF Special Operations Commander Lt. Gen. Bradley Heithold wants three more V-22 Ospreys before the product line ceases. 51 aircraft are already being funded through fiscal year 2016, however three more have been suggested as extra attrition reserves . According to budget documents, there are no further plans to procure the aircraft in fiscal years post 2016, so any additional orders would need to be added quickly before the end of production. Having four aircraft in attrition reserve as back-ups when an aircraft goes down will ensure that AFSOC forces are flying at its capacity of at least 50 airplanes well into the future, Heithold said.

Contracts NAVY

Press Operations

Release No: CR-132-15
July 14, 2015

Bell-Boeing Joint Project Office, Amarillo, Texas, is being awarded a $332,468,665 modification to the previously awarded fixed-price-incentive-firm target multiyear contract N00019-12-C-2001. This modification provides for the manufacture and delivery of five MV-22 tiltrotor aircraft pursuant to the variation in quantity clause in support of the government of Japan. Work will be performed in Fort Worth, Texas (24.6 percent); Ridley Park, Pennsylvania (19.2 percent); Amarillo, Texas (10.4 percent); Dallas, Texas (4.3 percent); East Aurora, New York (2.5 percent); Park City, Utah (1.7 percent); El Segundo, California (1.3 percent); Endicott, New York (1 percent); Ontario, Canada (0.9 percent); Tempe, Arizona (0.8 percent); Corinth, Texas (0.8 percent); Rome, New York (0.7 percent); Torrance, California (0.7 percent); Luton, United Kingdom (0.6 percent); Los Angeles, California (0.6 percent); Cobham, United Kingdom (0.6 percent); Irvine, California (0.6 percent); San Diego, California (0.5 percent); Yakima, Washington (0.5 percent); Brea, California (0.5 percent); Rockmart, Georgia (0.5 percent); Albuquerque, New Mexico (0.4 percent); Whitehall, Michigan (0.4 percent); Wolverhampton, United Kingdom (0.4 percent); Tucson, Arizona (0.4 percent); Erie, Pennsylvania (0.3 percent); Vergennes, Vermont (0.3 percent); Kilgore, Texas (0.3 percent); Shelby, North Carolina (0.3 percent); Avon, Ohio (0.2 percent); Santa Clarita, California (0.2 percent); Garden City, New York (0.2 percent); El Cajon, California (0.2 percent); Sylmar, California (0.2 percent); Westbury, New York (0.1 percent); and various other locations inside and outside the U.S. (22.8 percent), and is expected to be completed in June 2018. Foreign military sales funds in the amount of $332,468,665 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

Contracts CMV-22B

Press Operations

Release No: CR-060-16
March 31, 2016

        Bell-Boeing Joint Project Office, Amarillo, Texas, is being awarded $151,274,907 for cost-plus- fixed-fee order 0130 against a previously issued basic ordering agreement (N00019-12-G-0006) for non-recurring engineering services associated with the development of the capability for the Navy variant of the V-22 (CMV-22B) to perform the carrier on-board delivery mission.  The capability being added to the baseline MV-22 aircraft is extended range, high frequency beyond line-of-sight radio and a public address system.  Work will be performed at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (71.02 percent); Fort Worth, Texas (20.31 percent); Rockmart, Georgia (3.96 percent); St. Louis, Missouri (2.57 percent); and various locations within the continental U.S. (2.14 percent), and is expected to be completed in September 2020.  Fiscal 2016 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funds in the amount of $15,674,576 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

Contracts N61340-12-C-0033

Press Operations
Release No: CR-139-16
July 21, 2016

Bell Boeing Joint Project Office, Amarillo, Texas, is being awarded $9,561,182 for modification P00010 to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract (N61340-12-C-0033) for the procurement of one MV-22 Tiltrotor Containerized Flight Training Device for the government of Japan under the Foreign Military Sales program.  Work will be performed in Chantilly, Virginia (90 percent); Fort Worth, Texas (8 percent); and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2 percent), and is expected to be completed in October 2017.  Foreign military sales funds in the amount of $9,561,182 are being obligated on this award, none of which expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  The Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division, Orlando, Florida, is the contracting activity.

Osprey continues to prove itself in Navy carrier tests

CMV-22Bs heading to Japan in 2021

A U.S. Navy official disclosed that the carrier onboard delivery (COD) variant of the Osprey, CMV-22B, will arrive in Japan to replace the C-2 starting in 2021.

While the C-2 operates out of Naval Air Facility Atsugi currently, the CMV-22B is likely to be stationed at MCAS Futenma instead.

Contracts modification (P00042) for the Marine Corps MV-22

Press Operations
Release No: CR-224-16
Nov. 22, 2016

Bell-Boeing Joint Project Office, Amarillo, Texas, is being awarded a $267,250,000 modification (P00042) to a previously awarded cost-plus-incentive-fee, fixed-price incentive (firm target) contract (N00019-09-D-0008) for additional joint performance-based logistics support for the Marine Corps MV-22, and the Air Force and Special Operations Command CV-22 aircraft.  Work will be performed in Fort Worth, Texas (40 percent); Ridley Park, Pennsylvania (40 percent); New River, North Carolina (3.9 percent); Hurlburt Field, Florida (3.9 percent); Miramar, California (3.8 percent); Cannon, New Mexico (1 percent); Quantico, Virginia (0.6 percent); Kirtland, New Mexico (0.6 percent); Camp Pendleton, California (0.3 percent); Cherry Point, North Carolina (0.3 percent); Yuma, Arizona (0.2 percent); Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii (0.2 percent); Norfolk, Virginia (0.2); and various locations outside the continental U.S. (5 percent), and is expected to be completed in November 2018.  Fiscal 2017 operations and maintenance (Navy) funds in the amount of  $69,921,463; fiscal 2017 operations and maintenance (Special Operations Command) funds in the amount of $41,156, 000; fiscal 2017 operations and maintenance (Air Force) funds in the amount of  $4,409,537; and fiscal 2017 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of  $16,000,000 will be obligated at time of award, $115,487,000 of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This modification combines purchases for the Navy ($174,679,463); Special Operations Command ($83,531,000); and the Air Force ($9,039,537).  The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

Contracts

Press Operations
Release No: CR-248-16
Dec. 28, 2016

Bell Boeing Joint Project Office, Amarillo, Texas, is being awarded a $15,674,000 advance acquisition contract for long-lead components for the manufacture and delivery of six Lot 22 CMV-22 tiltrotor aircraft for the Navy. Work will be performed in Ridley Park, Pennsylvania (50 percent); Fort Worth, Texas (25 percent); and Amarillo, Texas (25 percent), and is expected to be completed in December 2017. Fiscal 2017 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $15,674,000 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured pursuant to Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity (N00019-17-C-0015).

First Fly The MV-22 Osprey by Instructor Pilot of Japan GSDF

Capt. Tomohiro Sato of the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force trains with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 204 aboard Marine Corps Air Station New river, N.C., Feb. 1, 2017. Sato will be the first Japanese MV-22 Osprey instructor pilot when the aircraft is introduced to the Japanese military next year. VMMT-204 is assigned to Marine Aircraft Group 26, 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing. (U.S. Marine Corps photos/video/story by Lance Cpl. Cody Lemons/Released)
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